Belize's most complete independent agricultural publication

Category archive

Featured

Unleashing the Potential of Under-utilised Crops: Breadfruit by Santiago Juan

in Featured/Issue 38 by

Belize has been blessed with edible landscapes. Take breadfruit, or masapan in Spanish, for example. In Belize you can see breadfruit growing in all our districts. In both northern districts you see old trees still producing well in very calcareous soils; in southern Belize large trees can be seen in low lying areas and brackish water like in Hopkins Village or along the Sittee River, a testament to the great adaptation ability of this humble plant. Most Belizeans have eaten breadfruit at least once in their lifetime; yet it is probably the most underutilized crop growing in Belize. Nowadays, it is attracting the attention of gourmets and some Caribbean countries are making small shipments to the United States, Canada and…

Keep Reading

Directorate General of Foreign Trade – Trade Opportunities with Cuba

in Featured/Issue 38 by

By John Rivero Deputy Prime Minister (DPM), the Honourable Patrick Faber, made an official visit to the Republic of Cuba from 22nd to 26th of May 2017. The objective of this state visit was to strengthen a bi-lateral relationship with Cuba. He was accompanied by a delegation of ten from the Government of Belize which included ministers, CEOs, directors, and Ambassador Burns accredited to Cuba. Belize and Cuba have always had good relations but bi-lateral trade and investment have been almost insignificant despite an existing trade agreement in place. The CARICOM-Cuba Trade and Economic Cooperation Agreement (TECA), originally signed by both parties in 2000, was recently re-negotiated with a sScond Protocol to amend the TECA. Belize’s trade officials have learnt,…

Keep Reading

Bamboos for Belize by Marquita Stanko and Taylor Walker

in Featured/Issue 38 by

Bamboos are some of the most useful plant species on earth. There are over 1000 species of bamboo distributed throughout the world that have been used for many practical purposes throughout history such as building shelter, making everyday tools and utensils and even as a food product. Bamboos originate from tropical, subtropical and temperate climates and grow on a wide range of soils. Many of the finest native and non-native bamboo species thrive right here in Belize. Our bamboo project began in 2005 in Rancho Dolores, Belize District with the formation of Tropical Agro-Forestry, Ltd. Our desire was to introduce new varieties in Belize that exhibit exceptional characteristics for use in furniture making, landscaping and interior construction. We began working…

Keep Reading

Establishing A Coconut Plantation By George Emmanuel & Omaira Avila Rostant

in Featured/Issue 38 by

Coconut (Cocos nucifera) is a palm that flourishes in tropical and subtropical areas, the fruit of which has many uses; it has been a major ingredient in the diets of many people living on tropical islands, creating a very lucrative industry worldwide. In recent years, the demand for coconut product has increased exponentially. It was reported that from 2008 to 2014 alone the demand for coconut products increased 700%, especially for water, milk, oil, fibres, and cosmetics. Such hasty growth has increased the demand for establishing plantations that can supply the high worldwide demand for coconuts. In Belize this opportunity has encouraged the establishment of acres of coconuts in new plantations. Here are some factors to be considered and recommendations…

Keep Reading

Belmopan Weekend Farmers’ Market at NATS Grounds

in Featured/Issue 37 by

By Sally Thackery  The new pavilions at the Belmopan showgrounds are now open on Saturdays and Sundays for local farmers to sell their products to the public. Opening day, Saturday July 29, was lively and well-attended, by both the public and the market sellers. Big thanks to CEO Jose Alpuche and Show Grounds Coordinator Gary Ramirez for such a bright vision for this property at the entrance to Belmopan. The entire showgrounds have been cleaned up, mowed, landscaped with beautiful plants and vendor stalls have been colorfully painted. These detailed improvements also include a new entrance gate, bathrooms in all sections and designated parking areas.In addition to fresh vegetables, the market offers dry goods, eco-friendly cleaning products, fruit trees, flowering…

Keep Reading

Beyond the Backyard: Suck Your Way to Health

in Featured/Issue 37 by

By Jenny Wildman I came across an article about a strange fruit that can boost your brain function – something all seniors think of when they cannot remember names or misplace their glasses. The picture was that of the fruit known here as kenep, kinnip or guayo. The deciduous, polygamous kenep tree is part of the soapberry family along with logan, rambutan and lychee, all cousins to the northern chestnut. The scientific name is Melicoccus bijugatus commonly referred to as Spanish lime, quenepa, genip, chennet, talpajocote and mamoncillo from the verb mamar to suck. Kenep trees are native to South America and the Island of Margarita and also found in drier woodlands and gardens of the Caribbean and Central America.…

Keep Reading

Industrial Uses Of Hemp

in Featured/Issue 33 by

A Short History of Cannabis Hemp Since ancient times, until this century, hemp was used throughout the world to provide food, fiber, paper, medicine, shelter and fuel. In the early 1900’s Henry Ford used fuel made from hemp to run the first cars, and believing that hemp would play an even larger role in the automobile industry, he built a car body made from hemp fiber that was stronger than steel, yet only a fraction of the weight (see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=srgE6Tzi3Lg).  Ford’s engineers found ways to extract methanol, charcoal, tar, pitch, ethyl acetate and creosote – all from hemp and all of which are fundamental ingredients used throughout industry. But since the prohibition of hemp in the 1930’s, these ingredients have…

Keep Reading

Beyond The Backyard – Ghosts Of The Graveyard

in Featured/Issue 33 by

They stand erect and tall as guardian soldiers, swords at the ready, ever on duty in our cemeteries. The dagger like plants of Draceanaafromontana and then Yucca were planted at the headstone or in place of one at unmarked graves to ward off evil and keep restless spirits from wandering. They are profoundly significant as a symbol of eternity and mourning in the cultural beliefs of tropical Africa. The tradition continued throughout the Americas and the Caribbean settlements, the Yucca becoming our sentinel. The name Yucca applies to more than 50 species that have mostly adapted to all types of terrain and share characteristics of appearance and chemistry. They are evergreens, drought tolerant, spread rapidly, fire adaptive, prefer full sun…

Keep Reading

Surinam Cherry

in Featured/Issue 33 by

Surinam cherry bushes grow all over Belize; they have pumpkin-shaped fruits that are botanically berries, but resemble cherries. If you are not familiar with Surinam cherries, imagine classic bing cherries with eight ribs growing on beautiful glossy evergreen leaved bushes. The cherries/berries look like cherries, but do not taste like cherries. The taste of the Surinam cherry fruit when ripe is said to resemble fig, mango, green pepper, with undertones of balsam and apricot, and even a touch of pine-like resin and tobacco aftertaste. Before the fruits are ripe they are tart, acidic and bitter tasting. It is best to pick only the fruits which are dark red and readily fall into your hand. There is a rare variety of…

Keep Reading

1 2 3
Go to Top